Advice for NIH Grantees: How to comply with the NIH Public Access Policy


“The NIH public access policy requires scientists to submit final peer-reviewed journal manuscripts that arise from NIH funds to PubMed Central immediately upon acceptance for publication.” – http://publicaccess.nih.gov/

To comply with NIH Public Access Policy, here are the steps you should take:

Determine if the Public Access Policy applies to your publication

Generally, the NIH Public Access Policy applies to any peer-reviewed journal article that was accepted for publication on or after April 7, 2008 and that arose from NIH funding in Fiscal Year 2008 or later.

Determine Applicability for Your Publication

What does the NIH consider to be a ‘journal’?

Review your publication agreement

Before you sign a publication agreement or similar copyright transfer agreement, first make sure that the agreement allows the paper to be posted to PubMed Central (PMC) in accordance with the NIH Public Access Policy.

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New SciENcv Features Allow Users To Create and Download Multiple Biosketches


NCBI’s recent update to the SciENcv feature in MyNCBI gives researchers the ability to create multiple biosketches for grants from federal agencies engaged in scientific research, allowing a more tailored and convenient approach to the grant application process.

What is SciENcv?

SciENcv (Science Experts Network Curriculum Vitae) is designed to help researchers assemble an NIH biosketch by extracting information from NIH eRA Commons and PubMed. The SciENcv interagency working group includes NIH, as well as DOD, DOE, EPA, NSF, USDA and the Smithsonian. You can access SciENcv if you have a My NCBI account. My NCBI accounts are free and offer many useful features, such as saving searches, automated e-mail alerts and My Bibliography.

 Create your biosketch

Based on user suggestions, we’ve made it possible to create biosketches in three ways: from scratch, from an external source, or by duplicating an existing profile (see Figure 1). While the eRA Commons data feed is currently the only external data option, we plan on adding other external data sources in a future release of SciENcv.

Figure 1. Three ways to create your NIH biosketches in SciENcv

Figure 1. Three ways to create your NIH biosketches in SciENcv

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The Second Offering of “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” at NIH


NCBI, in collaboration with NLM and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine NLM Training Center (NTC) at the University of Utah, recently presented the second offering of A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI. Health Sciences Librarians from 17 universities and two federal agencies attended the five-day intensive course on the NIH campus. This second offering of the training continues to prepare health science librarians for supporting NCBI molecular databases and tools, and training patrons in the use of NCBI resources at their own institutions.

Participants and instructors from the 2014 “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” outside the National Library of Medicine.

Participants and instructors from the 2014 “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” outside of the National Library of Medicine.

As before, all the course materials are available online. Feel free to learn from them, adapt them for your own teaching, and share them with others. You can use the links below to access the updated 2014 course materials. These include the slide sets with demonstrations and practice problems.

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Sequence updates in human genome assembly GRCh38: filling in the gaps


In a previous blog post, we explained several important concepts about the human reference genome.  We presented a region of human chromosome 17 as an example of a location where the genome sequence was not fully assembled.  In this post, we are going to revisit the same gapped region to see how the Genome Reference Consortium (GRC) changed this part of the genome in GRCh38, the updated human reference assembly released in December 2013.  This region represents just one of the more than 1,000 changes and improvements that the GRC introduced in GRCh38.

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The Tasmanian Devil 2: The tumor and Tasmanian devil mitochondrial genomes


The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the last remaining large marsupial carnivore, now faces extinction because of a strange and deadly infection, a transmissible cancer known as Transmissible Devil Facial Tumor Disease (TDFTD).  In a previous NCBI Insights post, we discussed gene expression data from the tumors that established their neural origin and showed the tumors were likely derived from Schwann cells.  In this post, we’ll consider some of the genome sequencing projects in the NCBI databases and explore evidence that the tumor originated in a different individual than the affected animal supporting the idea that the tumor cells themselves are infectious agents. Continue reading

NCBI’s Genome Remapping Service assists in the transition to the new human genome reference assembly (GRCh38)


In late December 2013, the Genome Reference Consortium (GRC) released an updated version of the human reference genome assembly, GRCh38, and submitted these new sequences to GenBank. This is the first time in four years that a new major version of the human genome has become available to the genomics community.

Perhaps you’ve been working on data mapped to the previous assembly (GRCh37) that became available in March 2009, or maybe you are still using an even earlier version, such as NCBI36 from March 2006. Is there a way to reduce the amount of time and effort required to reanalyze your data in the context of the new assembly?

Yes! It’s NCBI’s Genome Remapping Service, or NCBI Remap for short.

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A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI — an intensive training course for medical librarians to be offered April 2014


The NCBI in partnership with the National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC) will offer the Librarian’s Guide to NCBI course on the NIH campus in April 2014. This will be the second presentation of the course; it was previously offered in the spring of 2013 (NCBI Insights April 11 and May 6, 2013). After the course, we will post lecture slides and hands-on practical exercises on the education area of the NCBI FTP site and video tutorials of the course lectures will be available on the NCBI YouTube channel. Materials from the 2013 course are available, as well as lecture videos for the expression module.
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Introducing the New Human Genome Assembly: GRCh38


This month marks a major event in the realm of human genome research: the release of a new assembly of the genome, GRCh38. It has been over four years since the last major release (GRCh37 in March 2009), and we are going to explore several aspects of this new assembly in a series of blog posts over the coming weeks. In this initial post, we will give an overview of the data flow so that you will understand how NCBI received the data, where the data are at NCBI and what genome annotations you can expect from NCBI in the near future.
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Making Custom Databases for Web BLAST


An easy way to speed up your BLAST analysis is to search a smaller database targeted to sequences of interest. We’ll describe here a few ways to create such custom databases on the BLAST web pages.  For this Quick Tip we’ll use the pages in the Basic BLAST section of the BLAST home page.

BLAST parent databases

Generating a custom database begins with selecting the appropriate parent database. The BLAST Guide provides database descriptions to help with choosing a database.  You select the parent in the Database pull-down menu, shown in Figure 1. Selecting the database is really your first opportunity to customize.

BLAST Parent Database Pull-down Menu

Figure 1. The database selection pull-down lists: top panel, nucleotide databases; bottom panel, protein databases

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Setting Up Automatic NCBI Searches and New Record Alerts


Do you regularly perform PubMed searches to find new articles on your topic of interest?

Would you like to know when new sequence records become available for your gene?

Is it important to be alerted when new bioactivity assays are available with inhibitor data for your enzyme?

With a free My NCBI account, you can easily set up a series of e-mail alerts to notify you of such new information. You can read more about the many other functions of My NCBI.

Here’s how to set up these alerts:

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