New Pandoravirus Sequences are Accessible in GenBank


In the July 19, 2013 issue of the journal Science, an interesting article describes the discovery and characterization of two “giant” viruses that are proposed to comprise the first members of the “Pandoravirus” genus.

Nadege Philippe and co-workers obtained the viruses from sediment samples in Chile and Australia and found that they have no morphological resemblance to any previously defined virus families. The investigators isolated the genomes of these viruses and sequenced them using a variety of NextGen methodologies. They then assembled the reads into contigs and characterized them using various sequence similarity algorithms (including NCBI’s BLAST and CD-Search). Interestingly, while related to each other, the genomes were not similar to those of any other organism or virus. Additionally, 93% of protein-coding sequences had no recognizable homologs.

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Verifying Article Compliance for NIH Public Access


Are you trying to find out if your article complies with the NIH Public Access policy and/or find a PubMed Central ID (PMCID) for your article? If so, this post describes a simple method for finding the PMCID for an article and thereby verifying Public Access compliance.

First, let’s start with a bit of background. To comply with the NIH Public Access Policy, you need to make sure that your peer-reviewed articles that resulted from NIH funding (full or partial) and that were accepted for publication on or after April 7, 2008 are available in the PubMed Central (PMC) database with a PMCID. Please be aware that PMC is not the same as PubMed. PMC is NCBI’s full-text digital archive, while PubMed contains only citations and abstracts. It is not enough for your citation to be available in PubMed with a PubMed ID (PMID); you must have a PMCID to satisfy NIH Public Access policy.

To check that your article has a PMCID and is compliant, proceed as follows:

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