NCBI Begins HTTPS Tests


You may have heard that NCBI, along with the rest of the Federal Government, is switching to HTTPS-only access. To help prepare for this, NCBI is beginning a series of tests. During these tests, all traffic to NCBI will be redirected from HTTP to HTTPS to simulate our system’s behavior once the HTTPS transition is complete.

The first test will be Thursday, September 15, from 8:00-9:00 AM EDT.

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The Future of Existing GI Numbers at NCBI


NCBI has announced that we will be changing the way we handle GI numbers for sequence records in September 2016. (Read more, in case you missed it).

In this post, we’ll address a key question:

What is the future of existing GI numbers?

The short answer is that nothing is happening to these GI numbers.

If a nucleotide or protein record already has a GI, it will continue to have that GI indefinitely. You will also be able to retrieve such a record using its GI either on the NCBI web site or using the E-utilities.

Moreover, GIs will remain part of the XML and ASN.1 formats of sequence records.

If not GIs, then what?

Accession.version identifiers. All sequence records, both new and old, will have a unique accession.version identifier.

Existing records will keep the accessions they already have; new sequences will only receive an accession.version identifier.

So what’s all the fuss about?

Two things:

Stay tuned for additional posts about this topic, and please contact us if you have questions.

Find, Browse and Follow Biomedical Literature with PubMed Journals


Following the latest biomedical literature can be a challenge, but NCBI’s new PubMed Journals will help you keep up-to-date.

PubMed Journals lets you:

  • Easily find and follow journals of interest
  • Browse new articles in your favorite journals
  • Keep up-to-date with a Journal News Feed containing new arrivals, news links, trending articles, and important article updates (retractions and more!)

The PubMed Journals home page.

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