October 4th NCBI Minute: Create, link and share your bibliography (PubMed & ORCID)


On October 4, 2017, NCBI staff will present a webinar on author disambiguation and the advantages of using an ORCID ID.

Disambiguating common author names is tough in any field, but if your published research is cited in PubMed, we can help you find your citations, create a bibliography, and share your publication list with others.

In this webinar, we’ll also talk about the advantage of quickly registering for a free, unique identifier that will remain constant – even if your name changes.

Date & time: Wednesday, October 4, 2017 12:00 PM – 12:30 PM EDT

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with information about attending the webinar. After the live presentation, the webinar will be uploaded to the NCBI YouTube channel. You can learn about future webinars on the Webinars and Courses page.

Magic-BLAST 1.3.0 released with new features and improvements


The newest version of Magic-BLAST (v. 1.3.0) offers improved sensitivity and faster run-times as well as a number of other new features and improvements. These include the ability to set the alignment cut-off score as a function of read length, a maximum edit distance option and optional local cacheing for SRA files. For more information on these and other improvements, see the release notes. You can download the new executables from the NCBI FTP site.

Magic-BLAST is a tool for mapping large next-generation RNA or DNA sequencing runs against a whole genome or transcriptome. Read more here.

14 new NCBI RefSeq genome annotations are available


In August, the NCBI Eukaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline released new annotations in RefSeq for the following organisms:

  • Spinacia oleracea (spinach)
  • Carica papaya (papaya)
  • Zootermopsis nevadensis (termites)
  • Acanthochromis polyacanthus (spiny chromis)
  • Folsomia candida (springtails)
  • Helianthus annuus (common sunflower)
  • Acanthaster planci (crown-of-thorns starfish)
  • Myzus persicae (green peach aphid)
  • Momordica charantia (bitter melon)
  • Pieris rapae (cabbage white)
  • Nilaparvata lugens (brown planthopper)
  • Drosophila obscura (a fly)
  • Canis lupus familiaris (dog)
  • Limulus polyphemus (Atlantic horseshoe crab)

See more details on the Eukaryotic RefSeq Genome Annotation Status page.

RefSeq release 84 available


RefSeq release 84 is now accessible online, via FTP and through NCBI’s programming utilities.

This full release incorporates genomic, transcript, and protein data available, as of September 11, 2017, and contains 140,627,690 records, including 95,563,598 proteins, 20,356,598 RNAs, and sequences from 72,965 organisms.

The release is provided in several directories as a complete dataset and as divided by logical groupings. See the RefSeq release notes for more information.

Phasing out support for non-human organisms

As of September 1, 2017, the dbSNP and dbVar databases have stopped accepting submissions for non-human organisms. Submissions for non-human variation will now be accepted by the European Variation Archive, one of our partners in the International Nucleotide Sequence Database (INSDC).

NCBI releases newly designed dbSNP RefSNP Report – Alpha version


NCBI dbSNP is pleased to announce a newly designed Reference SNP (RefSNP, rs) Report webpage to provide enhanced performance and presentation for access to individual RefSNP records. This Alpha version of the report enables browsing of submitted and computed RefSNP variant data from the redesigned dbSNP build system.

The new RefSNP report (alpha version). You can see all of the sections described in the blog post, like the summary section and the sidebar menu.

Figure 1. The dbSNP RefSNP Report Alpha for rs268.

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Essentials of Glycobiology, Third Edition & New Glycan Website Now Available at NCBI


Glycobiology—the study of the structure, biosynthesis, biology, and evolution of glycans (the sugar chains synthesized by all living cells)—is a rapidly growing field in the natural sciences, with broad relevance to many areas of basic research, biomedicine, and biotechnology.

NCBI has two new glycobiology resources: the third edition of a definitive work in the field, Essentials of Glycobiology, and a new NCBI Glycans website that includes links to some useful external resources as well as the Symbol Nomenclature for Glycans (SNFG).

essentials of glycobiology

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