Advanced search comes to PubMed Labs


Advanced Search is now available in PubMed Labs!

advanced search pubmed

Figure 1. PubMed Advanced Search.

The tools included with Advanced Search help you:

  • Search for terms in a specific field (such as Author)
  • Combine searches and build large, complex search strings
  • See how your query was translated by PubMed
  • Compare number of results for different queries
  • Download your search history

Continue reading

Save and Share in PubMed Labs!


We’ve recently added save and share options to PubMed Labs. From your PubMed Labs search results list, you can now use the ‘Save’ button to save a selection of results in a variety of formats, including Summary and Abstract. You can also use the ‘Email’ button to share a selection of results, including abstracts, with colleagues.

share options in pubmed labs - twitter, facebook and permalink

Figure 1. Click on the ‘Share’ button to share to Twitter and Facebook.

Continue reading

Try out a new version of My Bibliography in NCBI Labs


My Bibliography is a component of My NCBI and allows you to create an online collection of your published work. You can import citations directly from PubMed or add them manually. For accounts linked to eRA Commons, you can associate citations with awards and manage compliance with the NIH Public Access Policy.

Are you a My Bibliography user?

We are working on a new My Bibliography and want your feedback! The new trial version of My Bibliography is an NCBI Labs experiment. It incorporates many improved features over the existing My Bibliography, including a color-coded view of compliance status, filtering by compliance status, and functionality on your phone.

mybib on labs

Anything you try or change in the NCBI Labs My Bibliography site will not affect content in your existing My Bibliography account, so feel free to experiment.

After trying the new My Bibliography, please let us know what you think.

Abstract display option added for PubMed Labs search results


Thank you for your feedback! The community response to our launch of PubMed Labs has been outstanding. We are continuing to test new features at PubMed Labs, like the addition of a new view for search results.

In response to your input, we’ve added “Abstract” to the Display Options of your PubMed Labs search results.

view pubmed labs search results by abstract

Figure 1. PubMed Labs search. Click the ‘gear’ icon at the top of your results page and click “Abstract” to see the new view.

Be sure to let us know how this and other new features in PubMed Labs work for you.

Please note that PubMed Labs includes only a limited set of features, and not the full set of PubMed tools. The absence of a PubMed tool in PubMed Labs does not mean it is planned for elimination.

Improved Search Now Available Across NCBI Databases


Earlier this year, we announced the release of a new and improved search feature that interprets plain language to give better results for common searches. This feature, originally developed in NCBI Labs and later released on the NCBI All Databases search, is now available across several NCBI resources: Nucleotide, Protein, Gene, Genome, and Assembly. Whether you are searching for a specific gene or for a whole genome, you will now retrieve NCBI’s best results regardless of the database  you search.

The image below shows the results for a search for human INS in the Nucleotide database. Even though this is a Nucleotide search, the results include relevant information from Gene, Protein, Taxonomy,  plus links to the NCBI reference sequences (RefSeq) as well as access to BLAST and the insulin gene region in NCBI’s genome browser, the Genome Data Viewer.KIS_nuccore_smallFigure 1.  The new natural language search result in the Nucleotide database from a search for human INS.

Try out this new search capability and let us know what you think. And keep visiting the NCBI Labs search page to try our latest experiments, which we’ll also announce here on NCBI Insights.

 

As-you-type-suggestions come to NCBI Labs


In a recent post, we described a new way to search our databases in NCBI Labs. We have now added a suggestions dropdown to the search bar that should make life easier for many NCBI visitors.

The as-you-type suggestions are simple, natural language-like queries we described in the previous post. They’ll help you avoid typos and save time if you’re searching for organisms with long or hard-to-spell names.

These suggestions are meant to direct you to high value results. As we improve the search experience, you may notice changes to the suggestions. We welcome your feedback on ways to enhance this new feature.

Here’s a quick look at what to expect:

dropdown suggestions ncbi labs search

Figure 1. As-you-type suggestions appear in a dropdown. Note how “human” is recognized as homo sapiens. Many common organisms are supported in this manner, e.g. “mouse”, “cow”.)

PubMed Journals will be shut down


Almost two years ago, we launched PubMed Journals, an NCBI Labs project. PubMed Journals helped people follow the latest biomedical literature by making it easier to find and follow journals, browse new articles, and included a Journal News Feed to track new arrivals news links, trending articles and important article updates.

PubMed Journals was a successful experiment. Since September 2016, nearly 20,000 people followed 10,453 distinct journals. Each customer followed 3 journals on average.

Though PubMed Journals will no longer exist as a separate entity, we hope to add its features into future NCBI products. We appreciate your feedback over the years that made PubMed Journals a productive test of new ideas.

NCBI Labs is NCBI’s product incubator for delivering new features and capabilities to NCBI end users.

Test drive a new sequence search experience at NCBI Labs


We know it’s not always easy to find the sequence data you’re after at NCBI. Maybe it’s because you’re no expert at constructing queries, and you end up with no results or too many results. Or maybe you’re an Entrez wizard, but creating a query full of Booleans and filters seems like overkill when you could just write a short natural language query, like you’re used to doing in Google.  The next time you search for a gene, transcript or genome assembly for a given organism, try the new search experience we’re piloting in NCBI Labs.

In NCBI Labs, you can now search for sequences using natural language and get the best results.

NCBI Labs transcript search interface

Figure 1. The new interface for specified transcript search.

The improved search experience now available in NCBI Labs addresses 3 types of queries that commonly fail in searches at NCBI: organism-gene (e.g. human BRCA1), organism-transcript (e.g. Mouse p53 transcripts) and organism-assembly (e.g. dog reference genome). For each of these query types in NCBI Labs, we now return NCBI’s highest quality sequence sets or reference and representative assemblies in an easy-to-view panel.

Example queries are shown below to get you started.

Continue reading