Improved Search Now Available Across NCBI Databases


Earlier this year, we announced the release of a new and improved search feature that interprets plain language to give better results for common searches. This feature, originally developed in NCBI Labs and later released on the NCBI All Databases search, is now available across several NCBI resources: Nucleotide, Protein, Gene, Genome, and Assembly. Whether you are searching for a specific gene or for a whole genome, you will now retrieve NCBI’s best results regardless of the database  you search.

The image below shows the results for a search for human INS in the Nucleotide database. Even though this is a Nucleotide search, the results include relevant information from Gene, Protein, Taxonomy,  plus links to the NCBI reference sequences (RefSeq) as well as access to BLAST and the insulin gene region in NCBI’s genome browser, the Genome Data Viewer.KIS_nuccore_smallFigure 1.  The new natural language search result in the Nucleotide database from a search for human INS.

Try out this new search capability and let us know what you think. And keep visiting the NCBI Labs search page to try our latest experiments, which we’ll also announce here on NCBI Insights.

 

NCBI’s Genome Data Viewer now displays data from track hubs


The Genome Data Viewer’s (GDV) browser display now supports content provided in track hubs. This new GDV feature, summarized in this short video, extends the genome browser’s capability when it comes to viewing user-supplied data tracks alongside NCBI-provided tracks.  You now have multiple options to analyze your data that include uploading your data (file/URL), streaming individual files from a remote location and/or connecting to a track hub. In all instances, GDV recognizes a variety of popular file formats with support for additional file formats planned. In the display, you can now also easily distinguish user-supplied tracks by their green-tinted track labels. Continue reading

Map Viewer retirement: New FTP directory paths


In October of last year, we announced the replacement of NCBI’s Map viewer with the Genome Data Viewer (GDV).  Here are some additional details on how to access to the older Map Viewer FTP content going forward and some information to help you with the transition to GDV.

As we announced last fall, we are no longer updating the data content of Map Viewer FTP directories. To help avoid any confusion over the meaning of the directory names,  we will alter the CURRENT and PREVIOUS directories under the species directories in the Map Viewer FTP area so that they no longer point to data. However, the existing data will still be available on the FTP site.

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NCBI’s Genome Data Viewer (GDV) to replace Map Viewer


The Genome Data Viewer (GDV) is now the main genome browser at NCBI replacing the Map Viewer, our original genome browser. GDV is a modern genome browser with essential improvements over Map Viewer. These include sequence-level details and an automated update process that keeps up with the rapid pace of genome sequencing, assembly and annotation.

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The Genome Data Viewer homepage (top panel) and browser view (bottom panel)

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