Tag: Genome Browser

Recent enhancements in Genome Workbench version 3.4.1

New Features

Version 3.4.1 of Genome Workbench, NCBI’s sequence annotation and analysis platform, includes new features for the the Multiple Sequence Alignment View, the Graphical Sequence View and the Sequence Editing and Submission Package as well as a number of other improvements and bug fixes.

In the Multiple Sequence Alignment View, you can now export publication quality graphics (Save As PDF/SVG  … , Figure 1). In the Graphical Sequence View you can now  search by locus tag, use improved search capabilities for genes by locus and can better display the selected location in the feature editing dialog when annotating a sequence.

MSAFigure 1. A multiple alignment view in Genome Workbench highlighting the new ability to save presentation quality image files (Save As PDF and SVG formats).

In the Sequence Editing and Submission Package, we rearranged the controls in the Table Reader dialog to fit onto smaller screens and improved importing feature tables that contain mat-peptides (mature peptide) features.

Bug Fixes and Improvements

We have made a number of other fixes and improvements.  For MacOS users we fixed blurry text in some dialogs, fixed the copy to clipboard problem, and improved support for the latest Catalina version.  We also fixed a crashing problem in the Active Object Inspector interface. You should also see improvements in loading SNP data and better recovery in cases of power outages or other events causing local file corruption.

In the Sequence Editing and Submission Package, we fixed a bug that occurred when applying miscellaneous descriptors and structured comment fields using the Table Reader and an issue with using a PubMed ID to look up a publication.

Please see the extensive help documentation including FAQs, videos, and tutorials linked to the Genome Workbench homepage for more information and examples on how to use Genome Workbench in your research.

 

Non-human variation data from EVA now available in the Genome Data Viewer

You can now view SNP variation data for many commonly studied animals and plants – including mouse, cow, Drosophila, Arabidopsis, maize, cabbage, and many more – in the Genome Data Viewer (GDV) and other graphical sequence viewers. This data is streamed from the European Variation Archive (EVA)  at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI).

On any NCBI graphical sequence view you can use the Configure Tracks menu and the Track Configuration Panel to add the track for the EVA RefSNP data. This track is available through the left-hand tab for Remote Variation Data (Figure 1).  The EVA RefSNP track displayed on the pig (Sus scrofa) chromosome 12 graphical view is shown in Figure 2.

Config_tracksFigure 1. The Track Configuration panel showing the Remote Variation Data tab and he EVA RefSNP Release 1 track. Select the track checkbox and click Configure to load the track.

pig_snpsFigure 2. The graphical sequence viewer showing the region of the growth hormone gene on pig chromosome 12 (NC_010454.4) with the EVA RefSNP Release 1 track at the bottom.  The track header has an (R) and a green highlight to indicate that it is remote data streamed from an external website. NCBI is not responsible for the content or availability of these data. 

The EVA SNP FTP site has more information about the EVA SNP data release.

Please contact us using the Feedback link on the graphical view to let us know what you think and how we can further improve your experience with the NCBI genome browsers and graphical sequence viewers

 

dbVar clinical and common structural variants track hub now available

dbVar, NCBI’s database of large-scale genetic variants, has a new track hub for viewing and downloading structural variation (SV) data in popular genome browsers. Initial tracks include Clinical and Common SV datasets. dbVar’s new track hub can be viewed using NCBI’s Genome Data Viewer through the “User Data and Track Hubs” feature (Figure 1) and other genome browsers by selecting “dbVar Hub” from the list of public tracks or by specifying the following URL.

https://ftp.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pub/dbVar/sandbox/dbvarhub/hub.txt

Main_Track_Hub_Dial

Figure 1. Loading the dbVar track hub in the Genome Data Viewer. The Track Hubs feature on the left-hand column of the browser allow you to add the track by searching for it or by entering the direct URL. You can select the specific tracks —  for example, “NCBI curated common SVs: All populations” — to load from the Configure Track Hubs dialog. Continue reading “dbVar clinical and common structural variants track hub now available”

Try out our new table download options from the NCBI genome browsers and sequence viewers!

Have you ever wanted a list of the genes you’re looking at in the browser – maybe to give you a starting point for candidate gene analysis, or to cross-reference with other data?

In response to your feedback and helpful discussions with you, we’re excited to announce a new option to download gene annotation data directly from the web sequence viewers and browsers.

This new feature lets you get a table of gene names, coordinates and other helpful information from your genomic region of interest.

Go to the Download menu on the toolbar of the graphical viewer to find options for getting sequence and annotation data.

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Continue reading “Try out our new table download options from the NCBI genome browsers and sequence viewers!”

View BAM alignments in the NCBI genome browsers and sequence viewers sorted by haplotype tag

NCBI’s genome browsers and graphical sequence viewers now allow you to view BAM alignments sorted by haplotype tag. This option is useful for analyzing variants within a sequenced sample and can help you detect or validate structural variants.GDV_bamsFigure 1. Remote BAM alignment data sorted by haplotype tag in the Genome Data Viewer. The remote BAM file was added through the “User Data and Track Hubs” feature in GDV.  You can load the remote BAM for this example through https://go.usa.gov/xpM9c. The sorted display shows that haplotype 1 contains a significant deletion in this region relative to haplotype 2 and the reference genome assembly. Aligned reads not assigned a haplotype tag in the BAM file are grouped under the heading “haplotype not set” (not shown). 

Continue reading “View BAM alignments in the NCBI genome browsers and sequence viewers sorted by haplotype tag”

Bulk track hub settings now in Genome Data Viewer

You now have access to bulk settings options for track hubs  in the Genome Data Viewer (GDV) and Sequence Viewer. These settings allow you to pick the default tracks that load into the viewer from your chosen track hub.  You can access the bulk options menu for by clicking on the collapsed menu  or “hamburger” icon (stack of horizontal bars) at the right end of the track grouping in the Configure Track Hubs dialog (Figure 1).Bulk_SettingsFigure 1. The Configure Track Hubs dialog in GDV. You can activate the bulk settings menu for a connected track hub by clicking on hamburger icon at the right of the track grouping.  Clicking Select Default tracks checks on all of the tracks in that grouping, Smoothed PhyloCSF in this case.  Continue reading “Bulk track hub settings now in Genome Data Viewer”

Vector graphics downloads now available in NCBI genome browsers and sequence views

You can now download images in both PDF and Scaled Vector Graphics (SVG) formats from our Sequence Viewer and genome browsers such as the Genome Data Viewer!  SVG files are ideal for editing in image editors and provide high quality graphics for publications, posters, and presentations. Both the PDF and SVG files that you download contain vector graphics for high fidelity images.

You can download image files by choosing the “Printer-Friendly PDF/SVG” option under the Tools menu from any Graphical Sequence Viewer application (Figure 1).

SVG_GDVFigure 1. Printer friendly download options from the graphical view in the Genome Data Viewer.  You can download either PDF or SVG formats, which are easily edited in standard graphics applications. 

 

Presentation on NCBI’s genome browser at Rocky Mountain Genomics Hackcon

Presentation on NCBI’s genome browser at Rocky Mountain Genomics Hackcon

On June 18, 2019, NCBI’s Sanjida Rangwala will demonstrate the rich data visualization capabilities of NCBI’s genome browser at a conference that is part of the Rocky Mountain Genomics Hackcon.  As mentioned in a previous post, NCBI staff will also participate in an NCBI-style Hackathon  as part of the larger event.  The genome browser presentation and demonstration will show you how to create visuals that provide insights and show connections among genes, transcripts, variation,  epigenomics and GWAS data from NCBI sources. You will also see  how you can upload your own data and embed NCBI viewers on your own pages.

November 14 Webinar: Variant Interpretation using NCBI Resources

November 14 Webinar: Variant Interpretation using NCBI Resources

Next Wednesday, November 14, 2018, NCBI staff will show you how to use NCBI’s genome browsers and other resources to interpret variants. The graphical displays of Genome Data Viewer (GDV) and Variation Viewer offer an interactive experience that allows you to explore NCBI’s rich collection of annotations, datasets and literature for deciphering your variant-associated data. In this presentation, we’ll step through case studies and show you how to quickly display relevant NCBI track sets — including the new RefSeq Functional Elements track, upload a file or remotely-hosted dataset and display these as a track, and use browser tracks to identify known variants, then assess variant functional and clinical significance and allele frequency. You will also learn how to navigate from the browsers to NCBI resources such as ClinVar, dbSNP and PubMed, for additional variant information.

Date and time: Wed, Nov 14, 2018 12:00 PM – 12:45 PM EDT

Register

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with information about attending the webinar. A few days after the live presentation, you can view the recording on the NCBI YouTube channel. You can learn about future webinars on the Webinars and Courses page.

 

 

Improved Search Now Available Across NCBI Databases

Earlier this year, we announced the release of a new and improved search feature that interprets plain language to give better results for common searches. This feature, originally developed in NCBI Labs and later released on the NCBI All Databases search, is now available across several NCBI resources: Nucleotide, Protein, Gene, Genome, and Assembly. Whether you are searching for a specific gene or for a whole genome, you will now retrieve NCBI’s best results regardless of the database  you search.

The image below shows the results for a search for human INS in the Nucleotide database. Even though this is a Nucleotide search, the results include relevant information from Gene, Protein, Taxonomy,  plus links to the NCBI reference sequences (RefSeq) as well as access to BLAST and the insulin gene region in NCBI’s genome browser, the Genome Data Viewer.KIS_nuccore_smallFigure 1.  The new natural language search result in the Nucleotide database from a search for human INS.

Try out this new search capability and let us know what you think. And keep visiting the NCBI Labs search page to try our latest experiments, which we’ll also announce here on NCBI Insights.