Tag: RefSeq

Updated prokaryotic representative genomes collection includes 685 new species!

We are happy to announce an updated bacterial and archaeal representative genomes collection. The current collection contains a total of 15,507 assemblies selected from 236,000 prokaryotic RefSeq assemblies to represent their respective species. The collection has grown by five percent since August 2021. A total of 685 species are represented for the first time. In addition, 370 species are represented by a better assembly, and 84 species were removed because of changes in NCBI Taxonomy or uncertainty in their species assignment.

We updated the database on the Microbial Nucleotide BLAST page as well as the basic nucleotide BLAST RefSeq Representative genomes database (fourth in the menu) to reflect these changes. Finally, remember that you can now run BLAST searches against the proteins annotated on representative genomes (second in the menu). Find more information here.

Venturing beyond the genes: New RefSeq Functional Elements publication!

If you’re curious about genome annotation beyond the genes, then read on! We previously blogged about our RefSeq Functional Elements resource, which provides annotation of experimentally validated, non-genic functional elements in human and mouse. Now, to kick off 2022, we’re delighted to announce a new publication in the January issue of Genome Research:

Farrell CM, Goldfarb T, Rangwala SH, Astashyn A, Ermolaeva OD, Hem V, Katz KS, Kodali VK, Ludwig F, Wallin CL, Pruitt KD, Murphy TD. RefSeq Functional Elements as experimentally assayed nongenic reference standards and functional interactions in human and mouse. Genome Res. 2022 Jan;32(1):175-188. doi: 10.1101/gr.275819.121. Epub 2021 Dec 7. PMID: 34876495.

Figure 1. Workflow for production of the RefSeq Functional Elements dataset. Full cylinders represent databases, the half-cylinder represents the indicated data source, and rectangles represent actions. Further details can be found in the publication.

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RefSeq Release 210 is available

RefSeq Release 210 is available

RefSeq Release 210 is now available online, from the FTP site and through NCBI’s Entrez
programming utilities, E-utilities.

This full release incorporates genomic, transcript, and protein data available as of January 3, 2022, and contains 302,482,881 records, including 220,595,192 proteins, 42,453,222 transcripts, and sequences from 115,929 organisms. The release is provided in several directories as a complete dataset and also as divided by logical groupings. Continue reading “RefSeq Release 210 is available”

Join NCBI at PAG XXIX

Join NCBI at PAG XXIX

Introducing the NIH Comparative Genomics Resource (CGR)

NCBI is looking forward to seeing you in person at the International Plant and Animal Genome Conference (PAG XXIX), January 8-12, 2022 in San Diego, California. We’re especially excited to introduce our newest endeavor – the NLM initiative known as the NIH Comparative Genomics Resource (CGR)– a platform we are developing to support comparative analyses of sequenced eukaryotic research organisms. Understanding and supporting the needs of researchers is a fundamental element in the development of CGR and is critical to its future success in supporting a large and diverse collection.

Please join NCBI for the following events to learn more about CGR and how you can inform its development:

Continue reading “Join NCBI at PAG XXIX”

New annotations in RefSeq

New annotations in RefSeq

In October and November, the NCBI Eukaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline released twenty-nine new annotations in RefSeq for the following organisms:

  • Acropora millepora (stony coral)
  • Bubalus bubalis (water buffalo)
  • Bufo gargarizans (Asiatic toad)
  • Chrysoperla carnea (insect) (pictured)
  • Coccinella septempunctata (seven-spotted ladybird)
  • Coregonus clupeaformis (lake whitefish)
  • Cotesia glomerata (wasp)
  • Daphnia magna (crustacean)
  • Desmodus rotundus (common vampire bat)
  • Drosophila ananassae (fly)
  • Drosophila rhopaloa (fly)
  • Drosophila simulans (fly)
  • Drosophila takahashii (fly)
  • Equus asinus (ass)
  • Felis catus (domestic cat)
  • Gracilinanus agilis (agile gracile mouse opossum)
  • Homo sapiens (human)
  • Hordeum vulgare subsp. vulgare (domesticated barley)
  • Jaculus jaculus (lesser Egyptian jerboa)
  • Mangifera indica (mango)
  • Mauremys mutica (yellowpond turtle)
  • Mustela putorius furo (domestic ferret)
  • Neomonachus schauinslandi (Hawaiian monk seal)
  • Neovison vison (American mink)
  • Thunnus albacares (yellowfin tuna)
  • Tribolium madens (black flour beetle)
  • Triticum aestivum (bread wheat)
  • Ursus arctos horribilis (brown bear)
  • Varanus komodoensis (Komodo dragon)

See more details on the Eukaryotic RefSeq Genome Annotation Status page.

RefSeq Release 209 is available

RefSeq Release 209 is available

RefSeq release 209 is now available online, from the FTP site and through NCBI’s Entrez
programming utilities, E-utilities.

This full release incorporates genomic, transcript, and protein data available as of November 1, 2021, and contains 296,293,486 records, including 215,655,378 proteins, 41,751,205 RNAs, and sequences from 114,396 organisms. The release is provided in several directories as a complete dataset and also as divided by logical groupings. Continue reading “RefSeq Release 209 is available”

New NCBI Gene Ensembl Comparison Expansion

NCBI Gene has added Ensembl Rapid Releases to the calculation of matching annotations between NCBI RefSeq and Ensembl. This has resulted in the inclusion of over 60 additional assemblies for a total of 241 organisms represented in the set. Matches are made based on transcript and CDS comparisons, and Ensembl gene, transcript, and protein identifiers for annotations similar to the NCBI RefSeq annotations are reported in NCBI Gene and in the gene2ensembl file on the Gene FTP site. The Ensembl annotation is also available in the graphical view and in NCBI’s Genome Data Viewer to give you a side-by-side view of how the annotations compare. Check out blue whale E2F1 for an example.

Figure 1. Balaenoptera musculus E2F transcription factor 1 in Genome Data Viewer

Updated prokaryotic representative genome collection

The bacterial and archaeal representative genome collection has been updated!  We selected a total of 14,912 of the 224,000 prokaryotic RefSeq assemblies to represent their respective species. The collection has grown by 8% since April 2021 and now includes Candidatus and endosymbiont species (Figure 1), which constitute 303 and 140 respectively of the 1,077 newly added species. In addition, 719 species are represented by a better assembly, and 70 species were removed because of changes in NCBI Taxonomy or uncertainty in their species assignment.

Figure 1. Graphical view of a portion of the RefSeq Representative assembly for the bedbug endosymbiont Candidatus Wolbachia massiliensis isolate PL13.

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NCBI Presentations at Biodiversity Genomics 2021 Highlight Growing Support for Comparative Genomics

NCBI Presentations at Biodiversity Genomics 2021 Highlight Growing Support for Comparative Genomics

The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) has several speakers at the upcoming Biodiversity Genomics Conference from September 27 to October 1, 2021.

Valerie Schneider, head of NCBI’s SeqPlus Program and Deputy Director for Sequence Offerings, will present a poster discussing how NCBI’s new comparative genome research focus will enable researchers to explore all eukaryotic research organisms, find related organisms and support additional organism-specific resources that a specific community may have or wish to develop.

Nuala O’Leary, Product Owner, NCBI Datasets will present the latest developments for Datasets, a beta resource that supports intuitive and flexible access to genome data for a broad range of taxa via a redesigned website and command-line tools.

Adelaide Rhodes, Cloud Subject Matter Expert in Education, will present two case studies that emphasize the ease of navigating the new Datasets website as well as the use of command line tools to speed up data discovery for genes and genomes of interest.

Terence Murphy, Product Owner, NCBI RefSeq will present a new tool for genome providers to identify contamination in newly assembled sequences with high sensitivity, specificity, and performance.

The Biodiversity Genomics Conference brings together a global audience to celebrate achievements in genome sequencing across the eukaryotic tree of life, explore current challenges and solutions, and to develop strategies for sequencing and data sharing in the upcoming decade of biodiversity genomics. NCBI has several programs that support the needs of this scientific research group.