NCBI on YouTube: new videos on PubMed, My Bibliography, sequence data and more


Here are the latest videos on our YouTube channel. Subscribe to get alerts for new videos.

Introducing the Genome Submission Wizard in Genome Workbench v3.0

Genome Workbench version 3 is a major upgrade, including the addition of the Genome Submission Wizard. This video guides you through the wizard, from uploading your genome data file to completion of the submitter report, which is ready to submit to GenBank using tools such as Submission Portal or BankIt. Note: An on-line tutorial is under “Manuals” on the Genome Workbench home page.

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Vector graphics downloads now available in NCBI genome browsers and sequence views


You can now download images in both PDF and Scaled Vector Graphics (SVG) formats from our Sequence Viewer and genome browsers such as the Genome Data Viewer!  SVG files are ideal for editing in image editors and provide high quality graphics for publications, posters, and presentations. Both the PDF and SVG files that you download contain vector graphics for high fidelity images.

You can download image files by choosing the “Printer-Friendly PDF/SVG” option under the Tools menu from any Graphical Sequence Viewer application (Figure 1).

SVG_GDVFigure 1. Printer friendly download options from the graphical view in the Genome Data Viewer.  You can download either PDF or SVG formats, which are easily edited in standard graphics applications. 

 

New search helps you find prokaryotic proteins


The latest improvement in the NCBI search experience is designed to help you quickly find microbial proteins. Now when you search for a prokaryotic protein name such as recombinase RecA in NCBI’s sequence databases or in the All databases search, a high-quality representative protein sequence is highlighted in a panel at the top of the results page (Figure 1).

The result panel also allows you to quickly link to related resources such as NCBI’s new pages for protein family models, Identical Protein Groups, and SPARCLE, NCBI’s protein domain architecture resource. We also provide as-you-type suggestions so you don’t have to type out some of the long names.

RecA

Figure 1.  The result for a search with recombinase RecA. The panel provides access to analysis tools, downloads, and relevant links to the protein family, the RefSeq protein, the identical protein group, and citations in PubMed.

Try these protein name searches, or your own, and use the as-you-type suggestions to assist your searches.

Please let us know how you like these results!

New results for organelle genome searches


As part of our ongoing effort to improve your search experience, we’ve made it easier for you to find the sequence of your favorite organelle genome plus all the information and data associated with it. To find organelle genomes, search for an organism name combined with an organelle description, for example human mitochondriontomato chloroplast or Toxoplasma gondii RH apicoplast.

A new results panel will appear with links to the organelle genome sequence, annotated genes, and related phylogenetic and population studies. The panel appears with these searches in an All Databases search or within any of NCBI’s sequence databases including Gene, Nucleotide, Protein, Genome, Assembly.  For the human mitochondrial genome, a graphical schematic of the genome allows you to navigate to individual mitochondrial encoded genes (Figure 1).

Organelle_sensor

Figure 1.  The organelle genome results for a search with human mitochondrion. The panel provides access to analysis tools, downloads, and other relevant results. Clicking any of the gene objects on the genome graphic links leads to the relevant Gene record, for example Gene ID: 4512 in the case of COX1.

Try it out using the following example searches and  let us know what you think!

September 11 Webinar: A beginner’s guide to genes and sequences at NCBI


On Wednesday, September 11, 2019 at 12 PM, NCBI staff will present a webinar for people with limited experience working with gene and sequence information. You will learn about the kinds of data available for genes and sequences, how to select the most informative records, and how to find related genes and sequences using pre-computed information and the BLAST sequence search service.

  • Date and time: Wed, Sep 11, 2019 12:00 PM – 12:30 PM EDT
  • Register

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with information about attending the webinar. A few days after the live presentation, you can view the recording on the NCBI YouTube channel. You can learn about future webinars on the Webinars and Courses page.

The new BLAST results are now the default view


As you may know,  we have been offering a new BLAST results (Figure 1) as a test page since April.  In response to your positive reception and after incorporating many improvements that you suggested, we made the new results the default today,  August 1, 2019.

You will still be able to access to the traditional results for a several months. This will provide you additional time if you need it to adjust your workflows or teaching materials to the new display.

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EST and GSS databases now retired


In July 2018, NCBI announced plans to retire the EST and GSS databases, and we have now implemented these changes. We will continue to accept submissions of EST and GSS sequences, but will no longer provide special processes for these sequence types. If you want to submit EST and GSS data, please use tbl2asn. For further details, please visit https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank/dbest/ or https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank/dbgss/ or contact gb-admin@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

We thank all past and present submitters of EST and GSS data for the invaluable benefit these data have provided to numerous genomic sequencing projects over the years. Please let us know if you have any questions or concerns about these changes!

Primer-BLAST now offers help with irrelevant off-target matches


Primer-BLAST, NCBI’s primer-designer and specificity-checker, now offers a way to help you with irrelevant off-target matches.

Sometimes Primer-BLAST can’t design specific primers for your target sequence because of similar non-target sequences in the database. In some cases, you may know that these non-target matches are not important your research and are safe to ignore.  Examples may include tissue-specific splice variants, redundant entries, and predicted sequences.  To help in these cases, you can now choose to allow certain off-target matches. This gives Primer-BLAST greater freedom in primer selection and a better chance of finding highly specific primers.

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Genome Workbench 2.13.0 now available


The Genome Workbench team is proud to present version 2.13.0, with the latest usability improvements and bug fixes.  See the full list of changes in the Genome Workbench release notes.

Some of the improvements include:

  • New SNP tracks using the most recent dbSNP release
  • Improved alignment statistics table to correctly account for introns
  • Alignment tooltips report introns separately from gaps
  • Fixes for several interface issues to make MAFFT and BLAST alignments easier to use.

Genome Workbench is an integrated application for viewing and analyzing sequences. Genome Workbench can be used to browse and import data from NCBI and combine it with your own private data.

NCBI implements new, natural language sequence search


In late May, we introduced a new type of search experience in NCBI Labs that uses natural language queries to make common tasks easier. The experience at NCBI Labs – where we experiment with potential new features and tools – proved successful. We’re pleased to announce that we added this simplified search capability to NCBI’s global search page. Some natural language queries now work in the “All Databases” search from the NCBI home page!

NCBI search bar, red arrow pointing to all databases

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