Tag: Human genome

Gapless Telomere to Telomere human genome (T2T-CHM13) now available

Gapless Telomere to Telomere human genome (T2T-CHM13) now available

On April 1, 2022, Science published the first complete sequence of a human genome, known as T2T-CHM13. This notable scientific achievement comes two decades after the first human genome release from the Human Genome Project and offers an in situ look at biologically important regions, such as centromeres, telomeres, and segmental duplications, that were previously unassembled. Read on to learn more about how you can access this assembly and related resources at NCBI, or to access any one of the more than 1000 human genome assemblies now in GenBank. Continue reading “Gapless Telomere to Telomere human genome (T2T-CHM13) now available”

RefSeq release 212 is available!

RefSeq release 212 is available!

RefSeq release 212 is now available online, from the FTP site and through NCBI’s Entrez
programming utilities, E-utilities.

This full release incorporates genomic, transcript, and protein data available as of May 2, 2022, and contains 314,915,153 records, including 229,417,182 proteins, 44,805,833 RNAs, and sequences from 119,373 organisms. The release is provided in several directories as a complete dataset and also as divided by logical groupings.

Human genome Annotation Release 110

Annotation Release 110 is the first new annotation of human in four years, including all latest curated RefSeqs, and recalculation of models using over 80M long reads and 9B Illumina RNA-seq reads. AR 110 includes annotation of two human assemblies: Continue reading “RefSeq release 212 is available!”

Venturing beyond the genes: New RefSeq Functional Elements publication!

If you’re curious about genome annotation beyond the genes, then read on! We previously blogged about our RefSeq Functional Elements resource, which provides annotation of experimentally validated, non-genic functional elements in human and mouse. Now, to kick off 2022, we’re delighted to announce a new publication in the January issue of Genome Research:

Farrell CM, Goldfarb T, Rangwala SH, Astashyn A, Ermolaeva OD, Hem V, Katz KS, Kodali VK, Ludwig F, Wallin CL, Pruitt KD, Murphy TD. RefSeq Functional Elements as experimentally assayed nongenic reference standards and functional interactions in human and mouse. Genome Res. 2022 Jan;32(1):175-188. doi: 10.1101/gr.275819.121. Epub 2021 Dec 7. PMID: 34876495.

Figure 1. Workflow for production of the RefSeq Functional Elements dataset. Full cylinders represent databases, the half-cylinder represents the indicated data source, and rectangles represent actions. Further details can be found in the publication.

Continue reading “Venturing beyond the genes: New RefSeq Functional Elements publication!”

RefSeq release 210 is available

RefSeq release 210 is available

RefSeq release 210 is now available online, from the FTP site and through NCBI’s Entrez
programming utilities, E-utilities.

This full release incorporates genomic, transcript, and protein data available as of January 3, 2022, and contains 302,482,881 records, including 220,595,192 proteins, 42,453,222 transcripts, and sequences from 115,929 organisms. The release is provided in several directories as a complete dataset and also as divided by logical groupings. Continue reading “RefSeq release 210 is available”

A new service to evaluate the quality of your assembled genome!

A new service to evaluate the quality of your assembled genome!

Are you wondering about the quality of a human, mouse or rat genome that you have assembled?

We offer a new service for evaluating the completeness, correctness, and base accuracy of your human, mouse or rat genome assembly compared to a reference assembly. You simply provide NCBI with one or more assemblies in FASTA format and we will do an annotation-based evaluation of the genome(s) using the expert-curated, high-confidence RefSeq transcripts for the species.

Continue reading “A new service to evaluate the quality of your assembled genome!”

Announcing RefSeq Release 206!

Announcing RefSeq Release 206!

RefSeq Release 206 is now available. This release includes the following:

Updated human genome Annotation Release 109.20210514
Updated Annotation Release 109.20210514 is an update of NCBI Homo sapiens Annotation Release 109. The annotation report is available here. The annotation products are available in the sequence databases and on the FTP site.

Other new eukaryotic genome annotations
This release includes new annotations generated by NCBI’s eukaryotic genome annotation pipeline for 45 additional species, including: Continue reading “Announcing RefSeq Release 206!”

RefSeq Release 205 is available!

RefSeq Release 205 is available!

RefSeq release 205 is now available online, from the FTP site and through NCBI’s Entrez programming utilities, E-utilities.

This full release incorporates genomic, transcript, and protein data available as of March 1, 2021, and contains 269,975,565 records, including 197,232,209 proteins, 36,514,168 RNAs, and sequences from 108,257  organisms. The release is provided in several directories as a complete dataset and also as divided by logical groupings.

Continue reading “RefSeq Release 205 is available!”

RefSeq release 204 is now available

RefSeq release 204 is now available

RefSeq release 204 is now available online, from the FTP site and through NCBI’s Entrez programming utilities, E-utilities.

This full release incorporates genomic, transcript, and protein data available as of January 4, 2021, and contains 262,714,372 records, including 191,411,721 proteins, 35,353,412 RNAs, and sequences from 106,581 organisms. The release is provided in several directories as a complete dataset and also as divided by logical groupings.

Updated human genome Annotation Release 109.20201120
Updated Annotation Release 109.20201120 is an update of NCBI Homo sapiens Annotation Release 109.

The annotation report for 109.20201120 is available here. The annotation products are available in the sequence databases and on the FTP site. Continue reading “RefSeq release 204 is now available”

December 2019 RefSeq annotations: human, Tasmanian devil and more

tasmanian devil sits, looking to the right

In December, the NCBI Eukaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline released new annotations in RefSeq for the following organisms:

  • Anarrhichthys ocellatus (wolf-eel)
  • Apis florea (little honeybee)
  • Contarinia nasturtii (swede midge)
  • Cucumis sativus (cucumber)
  • Galleria mellonella (greater wax moth)
  • Homo sapiens (human)
  • Nasonia vitripennis (jewel wasp)
  • Oncorhynchus kisutch (coho salmon)
  • Oreochromis aureus (blue tilapia)
  • Piliocolobus tephrosceles (Ugandan red Colobus)
  • Sarcophilus harrisii (Tasmanian devil)
  • Xenopus tropicalis (tropical clawed frog)

See more details on the Eukaryotic RefSeq Genome Annotation Status page.

New human genome annotation release with MANE Select and other improvements!

New human genome annotation release with MANE Select and other improvements!

There’s a new RefSeq annotation available for the human genome, and it’s quite an update!

About the release

Annotation release 109.20190607 is the first release of our new bimonthly annotation schedule as announced in a previous post.   The annotated sequences are  the latest sequences for the GRCh38, patch 13 assembly, GRCh38.p13 (GCF_000001405.39). The chromosome backbone sequences remain the  same, but we’ve added 45 patch sequences representing novel and improved sequences that the Genome Reference Consortium will incorporate into the primary assembly in the future. The new annotation places the latest curated RefSeq transcripts and functional elements on the genome but keeps the same model dataset as in annotation release 109 except when the models have been replaced by curated RefSeqs or other review. We are also flagging MANE and other RefSeq Select transcripts.  Continue reading for more details on these improvements below. You can download the updated annotation here!

Continue reading “New human genome annotation release with MANE Select and other improvements!”