Institutional Repositories in PubMed: a new quick way to free full text articles


New icons are starting to appear in PubMed that take you directly to free full text publications uploaded in an institutional repository (IR). Here’s an example:

DeepBlue

This one is from Deep Blue, University of Michigan’s Library IR. When you see it on a publication like this one on Ebola, you can get free access to the publication there.

The icons only appear when there is no free full text available from the journal or PMC (PubMed Central). So far, only 4 IRs with eligible publications are participating – you can see which ones they are here. They already expand access to around 25,000 publications.

The NCBI program that enables this is LinkOut. You can read more about it in the NLM Technical Bulletin. IRs can apply by email to join LinkOut. And if you are an author at an institution with a repository, support your IR and enable more people to read your work.

PubMed Citations: A New, Faster Process for Correcting Errors


This blog post is directed toward all authors who have articles in PubMed.

Have you ever discovered that your name isn’t spelled correctly in the citation on a PubMed record, or that there are mistakes in your affiliation, the title of the abstract, or other citation data?

We have good news: recently, NLM released the PubMed Data Management System (PMDM), which allows publishers to correct PubMed citation data directly. If you’re an author who has found citation mistakes in PubMed, you should contact the publisher of the journal, and they will make the changes. Changes made in PMDM, should appear in PubMed within 1-2 days.

Authors who report citation errors to NLM will be asked to contact the publisher directly. However, NLM will continue to investigate and address error reports that relate to our value-added data, such as MeSH Headings.

We’re hoping that this new process will shorten and simplify the process of correcting citation errors. You can read more about PMDM in the NLM Technical Bulletin. Please let us know if you have questions or comments, and we’re looking forward to more error-free citations!

NLM Webinar series: “Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data: EDirect for PubMed”


Beginning February 21, 2017, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) will present the three-part webinar series “Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data: EDirect for PubMed.”

This series of workshops will introduce new users to the basics of using EDirect to access exactly the PubMed data you need, in the format you need. Over the course of three 90-minute sessions, students will learn how to use EDirect commands in a Unix environment to access PubMed, design custom output formats, create basic data pipelines to get data quickly and efficiently, and develop simple strategies for solving real-world PubMed data-gathering challenges. No prior Unix knowledge is required; novice users are welcome!

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Find, Browse and Follow Biomedical Literature with PubMed Journals


Following the latest biomedical literature can be a challenge, but NCBI’s new PubMed Journals will help you keep up-to-date.

PubMed Journals lets you:

  • Easily find and follow journals of interest
  • Browse new articles in your favorite journals
  • Keep up-to-date with a Journal News Feed containing new arrivals, news links, trending articles, and important article updates (retractions and more!)

The PubMed Journals home page.

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Professors:  NCBI can help you streamline your teaching and research efforts


Professors, you’re busy – really busy. You have to develop and teach your courses and laboratory sessions, coordinate your lab’s research efforts, write grants and publications, and stay current on everything related to your teaching and research topics.

NCBI has information that would help most of these efforts – but there are so many interesting records and so little time to organize them for efficient use. Sign up for a free NCBI Account and let us help you organize your important lists!

my ncbi login page

Figure 1. The My NCBI login page.

Sign up for an NCBI Account – or sign in to your account if you already have one – and:

  • Store and automate your searches;
  • Save and manage collections of important records for use in coursework, research projects and federal grants;
  • Create public lists for students in your courses and your own Faculty Profile;
  • And keep track of everything – right on your My NCBI dashboard.

Read on to find out how to do all of these things and more!

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PubMed Also-Viewed: Quickly find related articles


You’ve seen it before on shopping web site: you load a page displaying an item you want and see a list of other items that people bought with the one you’re viewing.

PubMed is free, but finding the important articles on a topic can cost a lot of time. To help you keep on top of the literature – with a little help from your fellow PubMed users – we are introducing a new type of link called “Articles frequently viewed together”. For some PubMed abstracts, you may see this link in the “Related Information” section in the right column.

PubMed Also-Viewed feature

Figure 1. The PubMed Also-Viewed feature.

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Introducing PubMed Labs


Welcome to PubMed Labs!

PubMed Labs is all about you. It’s a new NCBI initiative for creating innovative and relevant products by involving you, our user community, from the beginning.

PubMed Labs is about experimentation. It’s a place where you’ll find early versions of new tools, experimental content, and proposed features, as well as an opportunity to suggest ideas to us.

PubMed Labs is about learning. It’s a place where the focus is on figuring out what works, where failure is OK because it’s a learning experience, and where any idea is welcome that can improve our services for our users.

PubMed Labs is about conversation. It’s a place where we can share future plans with you, and you can tell us how we’re doing. It’s a place where we all can come together to create resources that will benefit the broader scientific community.

Join the conversation!

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Setting Up Automatic NCBI Searches and New Record Alerts


Do you regularly perform PubMed searches to find new articles on your topic of interest?

Would you like to know when new sequence records become available for your gene?

Is it important to be alerted when new bioactivity assays are available with inhibitor data for your enzyme?

With a free My NCBI account, you can easily set up a series of e-mail alerts to notify you of such new information. You can read more about the many other functions of My NCBI.

Here’s how to set up these alerts:

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Early Developments in the PubMed Commons Pilot


It’s been an exciting and productive time since the PubMed Commons beta launch. We’ve learned a great deal, both here working under the hood and from the conversations in social media and blog posts.

We are working on answers to questions that people are asking, via our Twitter account and by revising and expanding information on the PubMed Commons page soon. And we will try out a Twitter chat: so keep your eye out on @PubMedCommons for the announcement.

There are now about 1,000 people signed up in the Commons. Remember, any author in PubMed can join, from anywhere in the world. Check out our step-by-step guide. Once you are in, you can invite others. So please spread the word!

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Joining PubMed Commons: A Step-by-step Guide


In our previous post we wrote about a new service called PubMed Commons that allows researchers to add comments to individual PubMed records. As we described in that post, PubMed Commons is currently a beta pilot release, and requires interested people to join the system before they can view or add comments. This post will describe how to join PubMed Commons.

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