Try Our New, Experimental PubMed Search and User Interface in PubMed Labs


NLM needs your input. We are experimenting with a new PubMed search algorithm, as well as a modern, mobile-first user interface, and want to know what you think. You can try out these experimental elements at PubMed Labs, a website we created for the very purpose of giving potential new PubMed features a test drive and gathering user opinions.

Please note that PubMed Labs includes only a limited set of features at this time and not the full set of PubMed tools. The absence of a feature or tool on PubMed Labs does not mean we plan to eliminate it from PubMed; it simply means we are not testing it now!

The key elements we are testing are:

In PubMed Labs, search results are listed by best match. The best match button is at the top right; you can also click the "most recent" button (to the right of "best match") to sort by date.

  • A new search algorithm for ranking (ordering) the best matches to your query

Based on analysis of data obtained from anonymous PubMed search logs, we have developed a new algorithm that we believe does a much better job of sorting search results by their relevance, or “best match,” to your query. This new algorithm incorporates machine learning to re-rank the top articles returned.

We were so excited by results with this algorithm that we already implemented it in PubMed, but it is still experimental and we would very much appreciate hearing what you think. Part of our test in PubMed Labs is having best match be the default sort, instead of PubMed’s default of sorting by most recent articles. If you find that you prefer to sort by the most recent articles instead, it takes only a simple click of a button to do so.

Interested in specifics about the new algorithm? You can read more in this NLM Technical Bulletin.

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October 4th NCBI Minute: Create, link and share your bibliography (PubMed & ORCID)


On October 4, 2017, NCBI staff will present a webinar on author disambiguation and the advantages of using an ORCID ID.

Disambiguating common author names is tough in any field, but if your published research is cited in PubMed, we can help you find your citations, create a bibliography, and share your publication list with others.

In this webinar, we’ll also talk about the advantage of quickly registering for a free, unique identifier that will remain constant – even if your name changes.

Date & time: Wednesday, October 4, 2017 12:00 PM – 12:30 PM EDT

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with information about attending the webinar. After the live presentation, the webinar will be uploaded to the NCBI YouTube channel. You can learn about future webinars on the Webinars and Courses page.

NCBI releases newly designed dbSNP RefSNP Report – Alpha version


NCBI dbSNP is pleased to announce a newly designed Reference SNP (RefSNP, rs) Report webpage to provide enhanced performance and presentation for access to individual RefSNP records. This Alpha version of the report enables browsing of submitted and computed RefSNP variant data from the redesigned dbSNP build system.

The new RefSNP report (alpha version). You can see all of the sections described in the blog post, like the summary section and the sidebar menu.

Figure 1. The dbSNP RefSNP Report Alpha for rs268.

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September 2017: NCBI to present EDirect workshop at NLM


On September 18, 2017, NCBI staff will offer a workshop on EDirect, NCBI’s suite of programs for easy command line access to literature and biomolecular records. To join the workshop, please register.

NOTE: This is an in-person workshop at the National Library of Medicine on the NIH campus in Bethesda, MD, USA. The course is limited to 22 participants.

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New on YouTube: Automate PubMed Searches & Save Citation Collections with My NCBI


The newest video on the NCBI YouTube channel will show you how to have your PubMed searches automatically run and the results emailed to you daily, weekly or monthly. You will also learn how to create PubMed collections that you can share with others or keep privately for yourself.

Subscribe to the NCBI YouTube channel to receive alerts about new videos ranging from quick tips to full webinar presentations.

New video on the NCBI YouTube channel: How You and Your Journal Club Can Contribute Using PubMed Commons


The newest video on the NCBI YouTube channel discusses how eligible individuals and journal clubs can join PubMed Commons and contribute comments.

PubMed Commons enables members to post comments about publications, which appear directly below abstracts in PubMed.

Subscribe to the NCBI YouTube channel to watch and receive alerts about new videos ranging from quick tips to full presentations.

New on YouTube: “NCBI Minute: Tailor Your PubMed Search Experience with My NCBI”



The recording of the June 28th webinar on My NCBI is now on YouTube.  In this NCBI Minute, we show you how to automatically highlight keywords, create custom filters that can be active every time you run a search, and permanently display up to 200 items per results page.

The NCBI Minute is a series of short webinars that give a brief introduction to a specific topic or NCBI tool. Learn about future presentations on the Webinars and Courses page.

July 19th NCBI Minute: Automate PubMed Searches & Save Citation Collections with My NCBI


Would you like to have new PubMed citations for your topic of interest conveniently appear in your email inbox or quickly collect those records for further review? Join NCBI on July 19, 2017, when we’ll show you how to have your PubMed searches automatically run and the results emailed to you daily, weekly or monthly. You will also learn how to create PubMed collections that you can share with others or keep privately for yourself. Don’t have a My NCBI account yet? Get started at MyNCBI.

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July 12th NCBI Minute “Crowdsourcing Post-publication Comments: How You and Your Journal Club Can Contribute Using PubMed Commons”


Join us for the next NCBI Minute, “Crowdsourcing Post-publication Comments”, where you’ll learn how eligible individuals and journal clubs can join PubMed Commons and contribute comments.

Date and time: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 12:00 PM – 12:30 PM EDT

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with information about attending the webinar. After the live presentation, the webinar will be uploaded to the NCBI YouTube channel. Any related materials will be accessible on the Webinars and Courses page; you can also learn about future webinars on this page.

PubMed Commons enables members to post comments about publications, which appear directly below abstracts in PubMed. Researchers and practitioners regularly assess articles in exchanges with colleagues and in journal clubs. PubMed Commons is one place where you can make key points from those discussions public and discoverable.