Hey Professors! Get your free personal assistant — an NCBI Account!


Professors, we know you’re busy ­­— really, really busy.  You have to develop and teach your courses and labs, coordinate and run your journal clubs and seminars, direct your lab’s research efforts, write grants and publications, counsel and mentor your students, and stay current on everything related to your teaching and research topics.

NCBI has information that can help with all of this, but there are so many interesting records and so little time to organize them. Sign up (Help) for or log in (Help) to your free NCBI Account and let us help you get started and get organized!

Read on – or watch the video embedded below – to learn more about what you can do with your NCBI Account.

Continue reading

NCBI’s Genome Data Viewer now displays data from track hubs


The Genome Data Viewer’s (GDV) browser display now supports content provided in track hubs. This new GDV feature, summarized in this short video, extends the genome browser’s capability when it comes to viewing user-supplied data tracks alongside NCBI-provided tracks.  You now have multiple options to analyze your data that include uploading your data (file/URL), streaming individual files from a remote location and/or connecting to a track hub. In all instances, GDV recognizes a variety of popular file formats with support for additional file formats planned. In the display, you can now also easily distinguish user-supplied tracks by their green-tinted track labels. Continue reading

NCBI implements new, natural language sequence search


In late May, we introduced a new type of search experience in NCBI Labs that uses natural language queries to make common tasks easier. The experience at NCBI Labs – where we experiment with potential new features and tools – proved successful. We’re pleased to announce that we added this simplified search capability to NCBI’s global search page. Some natural language queries now work in the “All Databases” search from the NCBI home page!

NCBI search bar, red arrow pointing to all databases

Continue reading

June 20 NCBI Minute: Getting the Genomic Context for BLAST Protein Matches


Do you ever want to see the flanking genes of a protein match from a BLAST search?  On June 20th, we’ll show you how to see the genomic context of bacterial proteins using the identical protein report and the graphical sequence viewer. You will also learn to use these reports in detail and how to get these genomic contexts in batch for a set of protein matches using the identical proteins report and EDirect .

Date and time: Wed, June 20, 2018 12:00 PM – 12:30 PM EDT

Click to register.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with information about attending the webinar. A few days after the live presentation, you can view the recording on the NCBI YouTube channel. You can learn about future webinars on the Webinars and Courses page.

February 14th NCBI Minute: How to quickly retrieve a sequence from NCBI


On Wednesday, February 14, 2018, NCBI will present a webinar that will show you how to quickly retrieve sequences in any format from NCBI.

Date & time: Wed, Feb 14, 2018 12:00 PM – 12:30 PM EST

Ever need to quickly grab a protein or nucleotide sequence in FASTA or another format from NCBI? This NCBI Minute will show you how to accomplish this using the nucleotide and protein web pages, an NCBI URL, and – the most flexible way – through the commandline EDirect client that accesses the E-Utilities API.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with information about attending the webinar. A few days after the live presentation, you can view the recording on the NCBI YouTube channel. You can learn about future webinars on the Webinars and Courses page.

Converting Lots of GI Numbers to Accession.version


As you may have read in previous posts, NCBI is in the process of changing the way we handle GI numbers for sequence records. In short, we are moving to a time when accession.version identifiers, rather than GI numbers, will be the primary identifiers for sequence records.

In a previous post, we outlined a method for converting GI numbers (used to identify sequence records) to accession.version identifiers. That method used the E-utility EFetch and is capable of handling cases where you have no more than a few thousand GI numbers to convert.

What if you have more?

We now have a bulk conversion resource that will allow you to handle very large jobs. The resource consists of a Python script coupled with a database file (about 40 GB uncompressed). You’ll need to download both of these files (gi2accession.py and gi2acc_lmdb.gz) to local disk, and then you can process as needed.

Continue reading